The secrets of successful salary negotiation

Salary is an important consideration on both sides of the employer/employee divide. Employers need to ensure they recruit – and, most importantly, retain – the best people for the roles they require, which means offering the right salaries; while employees have to make sure they are being paid the correct amount for their skills and experience.

But just how do you ensure the salary is right at all times? Here are just a few tips to follow:

Employees

One of the first things you need to do when looking for a new job is to establish what salary range you should be getting for the positions you’re looking for.

Of course, salaries differ widely across the country. What is on offer in Paris or London will usually be considerably higher than that offered regionally, and you need to be aware of this before you start.

Whatever the role you are looking for – whether it’s a technical role, operational management or one of the many other roles in the Print and Packaging industries – you should be able to find up-to-date, country-wide salary ranges with the most cursory of internet searches. Some of the job search websites will have the information you are looking for. Alternatively, try industry or trade sites.

Once you have an idea as to the general range on offer for your chosen role, you will be in a much better place to negotiate when and if you are offered a job. But any negotiations need to be handled carefully as you don’t want to stop a job offer in its tracks.

There are no hard and fast rules, but the advice is pretty straightforward and well worth following:

Don’t ask about salary at interview stage – wait until you are offered the position. When mentioning your salary requirements to a potential employer it is useful to quantify your value relative to your achievements. It could be how much profit you have generated or how much money you saved your company. If what you are offered is too low, say so (politely) – it helps here if you can state what the usual salary for the job/your level of experience is.

Ask about additional perks, such as a company car, and also about your expected level of responsibility, so you get the whole picture. It is worth considering things like additional training and education and whether you could be funded for further study. Unless the offer is exactly what you want, don’t accept it straight away. You need to make sure you are 100% happy with the complete package.  If all else fails, and you really don’t want to take the job at that salary, say so. If you are introduced to the hiring company by a reputable recruitment company they will handle salary negotiations on your behalf to ensure that both parties are happy with the deal that has been struck.

Employers

Employers should really be offering the best candidates appropriate salaries at different stages in their careers. You wouldn’t expect someone to take a pay cut in order to undertake more responsibility.

However, of course, there should always be room for negotiation. Again, there are some top tips you should be following:

Don’t ask the candidate what they are currently earning – you should have an idea from their CV, but probing into what they earn is intrusive and unreliable, anyway (who’s to say they will tell you the truth?). Make sure you are offering a competitive salary, which is attractive enough in the sector to secure the right candidates, without causing internal issues within your company. The salary you offer should be based upon the value you perceive the employee will add to your business and not based on what they are currently earning.

Also make sure you give prospective employees the whole picture before talking salary  including prospects, the challenge of the role, and other benefits. Prepare to be at least a little flexible. This has got to work for both parties. You need to factor in the possibility that the candidate will get counter-offered by their present employer. Make sure that the role and salary package are sufficiently enticing to ensure that they don’t decide to stay where they are. There is nothing more frustrating than an offer being rejected at this late stage.

Athena Executive Search can take the stress out of salary negotiation for both candidates and clients. We specialise in recruiting senior leadership positions in the Print and Packaging sectors across Europe. For access to more articles on industry topics, recruitment and retention strategies, and our upcoming webinar series with industry thought leaders please subscribe here: https://athena50147.activehosted.com/f/1 

360-Degree Feedback – Why You Should Be Using It

Feedback is an essential part of business, especially for Print and Packaging businesses that employ large teams who work together. If you want to improve the communication levels in your business, here is everything you need to know about 360-degree feedback – and why you should be using it.

What Is 360-Degree Feedback

360-degree feedback is feedback that comes from many different levels. Instead of one employee receiving feedback from their manager, they would receive feedback from a variety of people, including peers, managers, other workers, customers or stakeholders. This gives more accurate feedback that includes everyone’s needs and opinions, so the employee can significantly improve their performance and skills.

How a Printing and Packaging Company Can Benefit from using it

One of the main benefits of 360-degree feedback is that you can assess an employee’s performance from multiple people’s perspectives. This is very useful, as it is possible that one manager is unaware of an employee’s bad habits, so they may not point them out. However, a co-worker or a customer may be aware of these issues, and 360-degree feedback gives them the chance to air these so that any problems can be solved.

This is especially useful for employees who work in a busy environment, as teamwork and mutual understanding are essential parts of the business

It also gives employees more power rather than just allowing managers to make decisions. This means that employees will feel more valued and appreciated. It also means that they are less likely to have problems in the workplace, as they are able to air their grievances.

How to Prepare Employees 

It is important to discuss the benefits of 360-degree feedback before implementing it, as this means that employees will be fully aware of how it works. You should take the time to state that any feedback will be anonymous, so employees don’t feel worried about giving it, and you should also say that the system isn’t being implemented to make employees feel under scrutiny. It is being implemented to improve the workplace for everyone.

You should also take some time to sit down with the managers to prepare them for the results of 360-degree feedback. Many managers are not used to receiving feedback from the employees that they manage, and so they may feel attacked and worried about any negative feedback that they get. Thankfully, proper training and an anonymous system should remove any worries that your managers have.

Starting 360-Degree Feedback

Once all of the employees have been informed about 360-degree feedback, you can start to implement it. You should set clear rules to ensure that no one abuses the feedback system – for example, you may want to set one day of the week for when employees can leave feedback rather than every day of the week.

Athena Executive Search specialise in recruiting senior leadership positions in the Print and Packaging sectors across Europe. For access to more articles on industry topics, recruitment and retention strategies, and our upcoming webinar series with industry thought leaders please subscribe here:  https://athena50147.activehosted.com/f/1